October 17 , 2003
In this Issue

  1. $74 Million in Early Reading Grant Funds Announced
    Source: www.ed.gov - October 14, 2003
  2. Policy Brief - Investing in Head Start Teachers
    Source: NIEER Policy Brief (Issue 4, September 2003)
  3. New Centers Boost Muscular Dystrophy Research
    Source: NIH News - October 14, 2003
  4. A Child Becomes a Reader
    Source: ED News - October 15, 2003
  5. Annual Survey of Child Health Statistics Released
    Source: MCH Alert - October 17, 2003
  6. Infants Tested for Hearing Loss: United States, 1999-2001
    Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - October 17, 2003
  7. First Reports Evaluating the Effectiveness of Strategies for Preventing Violence: Early Childhood Home Visitation
    Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - October 3, 2003
  1. $74 Million in Early Reading Grant Funds Announced
    Source: www.ed.gov - October 14, 2003

    Thirty local education agencies and organizations will share more than $74 million in grants to improve the language and pre-reading skills of young children, U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige announced today. To read the full press release, which includes a list of grant recipients, go to: http://www2.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2003/10/10142003c.html. For more information on the Early Reading First program, go to http://www2.ed.gov/programs/earlyreading/index.htm.

    Top of Page
  2. Policy Brief - Investing in Head Start Teachers
    Source: NIEER Policy Brief (Issue 4, September 2003)

    This new policy brief from the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) includes current information on the qualifications and compensation of Head Start teachers, discusses the issues surrounding the push towards raising both, and presents the estimated cost of placing a highly qualified teacher in every Head Start classroom, phased in over eight years. To view the full policy brief online go to: http://nieer.org/resources/policybriefs/4.pdf

    Top of Page
  3. New Centers Boost Muscular Dystrophy Research
    Source: NIH News - October 14, 2003

    The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), parts of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), have funded three new cooperative research centers for the muscular dystrophies (MD), a group of genetic diseases that result in muscle weakness and wasting. The three institutes will fund the centers at up to $1 million in direct costs per center per year for 5 years. The NIH expects to fund up to two additional centers in future years. For more information go to: http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/oct2003/niams-14.htm.

    Top of Page
  4. A Child Becomes a Reader
    Source: ED News - October 15, 2003

    Two new booklets, published by the Partnership for Reading, draw on findings from scientifically based research to suggest how parents can help young children become strong readers. One is for parents of newborns through preschoolers, and the other is for parents of children in kindergarten through 3rd grade.

    Top of Page
  5. Annual Survey of Child Health Statistics Released
    Source: MCH Alert - October 17, 2003

    Summary Health Statistics for U.S. Children: National Health Interview Survey, 2000 provides national estimates for a broad range of health measures for children under age 18. The report is one in a set of reports summarizing data from the 2000 National Health Interview Survey, a multipurpose health survey conducted annually by the National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Estimates are presented for asthma, allergies, learning disabilities, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, use of prescription medication, respondent-assessed health status, school-loss days, usual place of health care, time since last contact with a health professional, unmet dental need, time since last dental contact, and selected measures of health care access. Estimates are shown in tables for various subgroups of the population, including those defined by sex, age, race, Hispanic origin, family structure, parent's education, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage, place of residence, region, and current health status. The report is available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_10/sr10_213.pdf.

    [Originally published in MCHAlert 2003 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]

    Top of Page
  6. Infants Tested for Hearing Loss: United States, 1999-2001
    Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - October 17, 2003

    Hearing loss (HL) occurs in one to three of 1,000 live births annually and, when left undetected, can result in developmental delays. To promote communication from birth, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) programs support early identification of infants with HL. Without EHDI programs, the average age of identification for HL is age 1.5--3.0 years, which is past the start of the critical period for optimal language acquisition. In 2001, a total of 48 states/areas with EHDI tracking and surveillance systems (30 funded by CDC) reported the percentage of newborns screened for HL. This report summarizes the results of an analysis of surveillance data for 1999--2001, which indicate that more infants were screened for HL, received diagnostic audiologic evaluations, and were enrolled in early intervention services in 2001 than in 1999 and 2000. Continued development of EHDI surveillance systems should assist states/areas in providing needed services to children with HL. Go to http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5241a1.htm

    Top of Page
  7. First Reports Evaluating the Effectiveness of Strategies for Preventing Violence: Early Childhood Home Visitation
    Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - October 3, 2003

    Early childhood home visitation programs are those in which parents and children are visited in their home during the child's first 2 years of life by trained personnel who provide some combination of the following: information, support, or training regarding child health, development, and care. Home visitation has been used for a wide range of objectives, including improvement of the home environment, family development, and prevention of child behavior problems. The Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) conducted a systematic review of scientific evidence concerning the effectiveness of early childhood home visitation for preventing several forms of violence: violence by the visited child against self or others; violence against the child (i.e., maltreatment [abuse or neglect]); other violence by the visited parent; and intimate partner violence ... This report provides information regarding the findings, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, and provides information that can help in applying the recommended intervention locally. It is available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/RR/RR5214.pdf.

    Top of Page